Initial D

Initial D, full movie.

The movie that changed it all for me.
In my language~

Sick of the usual shit from all the car blogs. Still the same crap; I can probably name 99% of the carmakers that they reblog.Bentley.Audi.Rolls Royce.Porsche.Lamborghini.Ferrari.Aston Martin.BMW.Mercedes-Benz.Nissan. (Might as well say GTR because that’s the only car that’s reblogged.)Lamborghini.Porsche.Ferrari.I only named 10 randomly in like 10 seconds and yet they probably have only 1 car for every 999,999,999 that doesn’t fall under one of the carmakers above.What happened to the actual love of cars? Just having one of the more expensive brand names doesn’t/isn’t the only way of saying to the world that you’re a baller.Some people actually buy a car for its looks, style, speed, legacy, etc.Blogs like the generic rebloggers of the higher-end cars make me even more adamant on getting myself a now-old school M3. Will not fall into the hype over the newest, latest model.Here’s a VeilSide Mazda RX-7. Yes it’s real.This is an example of something that I’d like to see more of, personally. An old car, yes, but restored and modded to hell; bet most people wouldn’t even recognize that it’s a Mazda. (Same as the one driven by Han in Tokyo Drift, just different paint color - his was orange and black.) Everyone’s been taught to identify the Italian cars but not classics like these. Or the aftermarket companies that do crazy work on cars like these.Nobody appreciates old-school, home-grown, modified cars anymore.It’s all about the newest, latest, fastest.

Sick of the usual shit from all the car blogs. Still the same crap; I can probably name 99% of the carmakers that they reblog.

Bentley.
Audi.
Rolls Royce.
Porsche.
Lamborghini.
Ferrari.
Aston Martin.
BMW.
Mercedes-Benz.
Nissan. (Might as well say GTR because that’s the only car that’s reblogged.)
Lamborghini.
Porsche.
Ferrari.

I only named 10 randomly in like 10 seconds and yet they probably have only 1 car for every 999,999,999 that doesn’t fall under one of the carmakers above.

What happened to the actual love of cars? Just having one of the more expensive brand names doesn’t/isn’t the only way of saying to the world that you’re a baller.

Some people actually buy a car for its looks, style, speed, legacy, etc.

Blogs like the generic rebloggers of the higher-end cars make me even more adamant on getting myself a now-old school M3. Will not fall into the hype over the newest, latest model.

Here’s a VeilSide Mazda RX-7. Yes it’s real.
This is an example of something that I’d like to see more of, personally. An old car, yes, but restored and modded to hell; bet most people wouldn’t even recognize that it’s a Mazda. (Same as the one driven by Han in Tokyo Drift, just different paint color - his was orange and black.)
Everyone’s been taught to identify the Italian cars but not classics like these. Or the aftermarket companies that do crazy work on cars like these.

Nobody appreciates old-school, home-grown, modified cars anymore.
It’s all about the newest, latest, fastest.

Random car fanatic’s thoughts #1

Has anyone ever thought of modifying a (Chevy) Cobalt to make it look like a GTR? The rears look similar-ish and that’s enough to make a doppelganger with a custom bodykit.

Result: LOLs from everyone and fear if you get it done right (if you throw enough cash at it of course)

Requirements: One rich individual, loves cars, big sense of humor, lots of spare time.

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An E46 GTR came to life on February 2001, powered by the P60B40 a 3,997 cc V8 producing 493 hp (368 kW; 500 PS). Unlike the straight-six powered M3 versions, which were outpaced by the Porsche 996 GT3, the racing version of the E46 M3 GTR 16 was very successful in the American Le Mans Series (ALMS), entered by Schnitzer Motorsport.
Rivals such as Porsche pointed out that this car was more of a prototype as no V8 engine was available in the road-going BMW E46, which is in violation of the spirit of Gran Turismo. In 2001, ALMS regulations stated that cars must be for sale on two continents within twelve months of the rules being issued. To fulfill this rule, BMW put 10 road going GTRs on sale after the 2001 season, for 250,000 euros (then $218,000) each.
The ALMS rules were altered for 2002 to state that 100 cars and 1,000 engines must be built for the car to qualify without penalties. Although BMW could have raced the V8 with the new weight and power penalties under these new regulations, they chose to pull out of the ALMS, effectively ending the short-lived M3 GTR’s career.
Two Schnitzer Motorsport GTR cars saw a comeback in 2003 at the 24 Hours Nürburgring, winning 1–2 in 2004 and 2005, as well as entries in the 24 Hours Spa. Onboard coverage recorded in 2004 Hans-Joachim Stuck, Pedro Lamy, Jörg Müller and Dirk Müller on the Nürburgring and Spa-Francorchamps.
Private teams (Scheid, Getrag, etc.) also have fit 3,997 cc BMW V8 engines into the E46 body to race on the Nürburgring, winning some VLN races in the last years.

An E46 GTR came to life on February 2001, powered by the P60B40 a 3,997 cc V8 producing 493 hp (368 kW; 500 PS). Unlike the straight-six powered M3 versions, which were outpaced by the Porsche 996 GT3, the racing version of the E46 M3 GTR 16 was very successful in the American Le Mans Series (ALMS), entered by Schnitzer Motorsport.

Rivals such as Porsche pointed out that this car was more of a prototype as no V8 engine was available in the road-going BMW E46, which is in violation of the spirit of Gran Turismo. In 2001, ALMS regulations stated that cars must be for sale on two continents within twelve months of the rules being issued. To fulfill this rule, BMW put 10 road going GTRs on sale after the 2001 season, for 250,000 euros (then $218,000) each.

The ALMS rules were altered for 2002 to state that 100 cars and 1,000 engines must be built for the car to qualify without penalties. Although BMW could have raced the V8 with the new weight and power penalties under these new regulations, they chose to pull out of the ALMS, effectively ending the short-lived M3 GTR’s career.

Two Schnitzer Motorsport GTR cars saw a comeback in 2003 at the 24 Hours Nürburgring, winning 1–2 in 2004 and 2005, as well as entries in the 24 Hours Spa. Onboard coverage recorded in 2004 Hans-Joachim Stuck, Pedro Lamy, Jörg Müller and Dirk Müller on the Nürburgring and Spa-Francorchamps.

Private teams (Scheid, Getrag, etc.) also have fit 3,997 cc BMW V8 engines into the E46 body to race on the Nürburgring, winning some VLN races in the last years.


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